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RARE HEATHLAND DISCOVERED IN SE ENGLAND

Added: (Tue Sep 04 2001)

Pressbox (Press Release) - RARE HEATHLAND DISCOVERED AT BEDGEBURY PINETUM

A recent survey carried out at Bedgebury Pinetum suggests that Bedgebury’s heathlands could be amongst the best in the South-East.

The survey has uncovered many unusual and rare flowers including the Common Dodder, which is difficult to see as it grows in small clusters. The plant bears pink flowers which grow on red twining stems.

The heather at Bedgebury Pinetum is in full bloom at this time of year, providing a carpet of warm mauve colour across the valleys. The grasslands and meadow flowers are also showing off their blooms to attract the insects.

Insects including bees, butterflies and ragonflies can be found in abundance at this time of year, making the Pinetum a truly spectacular place to visit and take photographs.

For further information or photographs please contact: Caroline Edmunds on 01892 616647 or Chris Reynolds on 01580 211044.

Notes to Editors
Bedgebury Pinetum was started in 1925. This marvellous collection has developed into the "most comprehensively complete" collection on one site in the world, with 300 acres containing over 6000 specimen trees. These trees represent coniferous species throughout the temperate world in all their variety of size, shape and colour.

Besides containing many of the oldest and largest examples in Britain, the collection includes rare, endangered and historically important trees.

Originally designed by William Dallimore, a notable botanist for Kew, the Pinetum enjoys historic links with Gardens both at Kew and Wakehurst.

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